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Jurying Info & Forms

INFORMATION FOR POTENTIAL ARTISTS AND CRAFTSPEOPLE

Jury Form (printer friendly)

Consignors Receipt Form (printer friendly)

The Art Center is a non-profit organization.  It was organized to provide visual arts experiences, both producing and consuming, for all residents of the area.  It is the only local agency providing such services.  The Art Center opened its doors on August 4, 1984.

Our hours are: January through April: Tuesday through Saturday, 10:00am to 4:30pm.

May through December: Monday through Saturday, 10:00am to 4:30pm.

The Alleghany Highlands Arts and Crafts Center hopes you will be interested in selling in the shop.  Visitors, vacationers, and area residents are increasingly attracted to the shop.  State attraction highway signs on Interstate 64 east and west and Route 220 south bring visitors from near and far.

Located in downtown Clifton Forge, the facility was purchased in late 1983 with funding support of more than 320 individuals, 45 businesses and 26 organizations, thus indicating the area’s need and enthusiasm for the project.  The building underwent extensive renovation to provide exhibit, demonstration, instruction and work space, as well as a sales outlet for the artists and crafts people.  The Center and its programs are accessible to the handicapped.

Clifton Forge is accessible via Exits 24 and 27 off Interstate 64 and is located 32 miles west of Lexington, VA, and 34 miles east of White Sulphur Springs, WV.  If one is traveling Route 220, we are 45 miles north of Roanoke, VA, and 25 miles south of Hot Springs, VA.  Lake Moomaw recreational area, Douthat State Park, and Gathright Dam are also in close proximity.

PURPOSES OF THE CENTER SHOP

  1. To seek artists and crafts people in the Alleghany Highlands and elsewhere to sell arts and handcrafts through the shop.
  2. To help the individual artists and crafts people aim for their best by setting and maintaining high standards.
  3. To supply the buying public with a source of high quality arts and crafts.
  4. To market and promote the fine arts and handcrafts of the Alleghany Highlands.

CONSIGNMENT ARRANGEMENT

All goods sold through the Center Shop will be on consignment.  Thirty percent (30%) of the retail price will be retained by the shop; seventy percent (70%) goes to the artist/craftsperson.  If a customer, such as a gift or museum shop calls the Center Shop about a wholesale order, he will be referred to the artist/craftsperson and ten percent (10%) commission will be taken by the shop.

The artist/craftsperson sets his/her own retail prices.  Prices should be in increments of twenty-five cents up to twenty-five dollars ($25.00) and fifty cents thereafter (i.e., no $8.50 each or two for $16.00).

WHAT IS EXPECTED OF THE ARTIST/CRAFTSPERSON

  1. The Center Shop expects continued high quality once the Committee approves the artist.  The Standards Committee regularly checks the shop.  If some item is not up to juried standards, it is removed from the shelf, and the artist/craftsperson is notified.
  1. You do not have to be a member of the Art Center to sell in the Center Shop; however, we would like very much to have you as a member or as a volunteer.

NOTE   This information is subject to periodic review and possible revision.  If you have any suggestions or comments, they will be welcome.  The Center would like to be as much help as possible to artists and crafts persons.  We are proud of the results of our many hours of planning, fund raising, renovating, painting, etc. that have gone into the Art Center.  We will be continually looking for quality art and crafts to enhance the Center Shop so that we can better serve you – the artist and craftsperson.

 

JURYING PROCEDURE

All work for sale in the Center Shop will be screened and passed by the Art Center’s Standards Committee. The Committee meets 3 times a year – MARCH, May, and September. All submissions will be juried the second week of these months, decisions will be announced by the fourth week of the month. It is advisable that work be delivered to the Center by the preceding Tuesday. PLEASE CALL AHEAD FOR BEST TIMES TO SUBMIT WORK.

The Standards Committee will jury for color, design, creativity, craftsmanship, and consistency. Jurors will evaluate three representative items in each category for each artist (i.e. in one medium and technique). There is a list of media categories on page three (3).  Examples of media and technique are:  fine arts-oil, watercolor, fabric-quilted, glass-blown, etc.

If accepted, the artist or craftsperson may submit items he/she wishes to sell in that category only.  Should he/she want to sell in another category he/she must be juried in the second technique or medium as well.

WHEN SUBMITTED FOR JURYING, ALL WORK MUST BE COMPLETELY FINISHED AND PRESENTATION READY. FRAMED ARTWORK SHOULD BE READY TO HANG WITH SCREW EYES AND WIRE. SAWTOOTH HANGERS ARE NOT ACCEPTABLE. WATERCOLORS AND PASTELS SHOULD BE MATTED UNDER GLASS OR PLEXIGLASS.  GALLERY WRAPPED CANVASES OR CRADLE BOARDS ARE ACCEPTABLE.

PORTFOLIO ITEMS (THOSE WITH NO FRAME OR GLASS) MUST BE IN CLEAN BEVELED MATS SUITABLE IN COLOR AND WIDTH. PORTFOLIO WORK MUST BE SHRINK-WRAPPED.

The Jury Committee and the shop will also need the following information where applicable:

  1. Fiber and wood products MUST include a “care” label.
  2. Fabric content label and care instructions are REQUIRED.
  3. Instructions for puzzles, games, or toys SHOULD BE ATTACHED.
  4. Hazardous toys should have an age level warning attached.

DESIGN is the solution to a problem.  Design includes the use of and sensitivity to materials, the understanding of proportion, color, form, size and texture.  Craftwork should consist of more than just the assembling of manufactured parts or the decoration of machine-made things.  If pre-manufactured parts are used, the finished work will be acceptable only when the artist-craftsperson’s contribution to design and creativeness results in a finished product that dominates the pre-manufactured parts.  Surface design or ornament is used to enhance the form of an object and needs to be subordinate to both form and function.  Materials used must be of high quality and well suited to the medium.

Commercial design will be allowed.  However, the overall quality, including creativity, will be the deciding factor.

CRAFTSMANSHIP reflects the skill of the artist/craftsperson.  All acceptable work must show a mastery of the necessary skills, and the execution should show high standards of quality.

MARKETABILITY The final retail price will be set by the artist/craftsperson.  If he/she requests help, or if the Standards Committee feels an item is priced to high or too low for the existing market, the committee will offer suggestions or guidelines.

Factors that enter into pricing are as follows:

  1. cost of materials
  2. time involved in designing, executing and finishing an item
  3. skill and experience of the artist/craftsperson
  4. whether the item is production line or one-of-a-kind
  5. location of sale (i.e. rural, or urban, home or store, etc.)
  6. recognition or “name” the artist/craftsperson has earned
  7. what the public will pay.

PRICING   When you have determined your wholesale price, the shop’s retail price can be figured as follows:     Retail price =  ____Consignor Price___             OR             Consignor Price = .7 x Retail price .7

DEFINITION OF “HANDCRAFT” AND MEDIA CATEGORIES

(Including some techniques and products that can be made)

The Center’s definition of the work “handcraft” has been adopted from the Southern Highlands Handcraft Guild.  A handcraft is “an article meeting high standards of craftsmanship, fashioned by hand, hand tools or hand-directed machine tools, displaying imagination, good taste, and design or honoring the finest in traditional designs and use of materials.”  The following media categories are used for the Center Shop:

  1. Clay and or polymer clay – thrown, hand-built, molded containers, tiles, toys, instruments, sculptural forms, etc.  Ceramic work cast by someone else and “painted” by the craftsperson is unsuitable for the shop.  If the craftsperson casts his/her own work, it could be acceptable.
  1. Fabric – surface designed (painted, batiked, direct dyed, tie-dyed, appliquéd, embroidered, etc.)
  1. Fiber – woven, non-woven (knitted, crocheted, needle/bobbin lace, knotted, felted, plaited, coiled, wickerwork, twined, etc.)
  1. Glass – blown, constructed cast, turned, containers, paperweights, enamels, leaded glass, glass forms, beads, etc.
  1. Leather – constructed, molded, tooled bags, clothing, footwear, masks, etc.
  1. Metal – raised, constructed, cast, turned, clothing and body adornments, containers, utensils, toys, metal forms, etc.
  1. Natural Materials – constructed decorative and functional works of cones, seedpods, corn husks, shells and other natural materials.
  1. Paper – construction, decorated, blockprinted, beaded, note cards, wall pieces, handmade papers which may be laminated with media-altered surfaces.
  1. Plastic – constructed, molded, fused containers, body and clothing adornments, toys, utensils, etc.
  1. Stone – tumbled, cut/carved, constructed, polished gemstones.
  1. Wax – constructed, molded candles.
  1. Wood – turned, carved, inlaid, joined furniture, utensils, containers, toys, instruments, carved forms, beads, etc.
  1. Fine Arts – oil and acrylic paintings, watercolors, drawings, collages, stenciling, mixed media, artist made prints (etching, intaglio, silk-screen, wood-block, linoleum print, monoprint, monotype      and      collograph). No more than 50% of an artist’s work may be mechanical reproductions.

FRAMING AND  MATTING  EXPECTATIONS FOR FINE ART  

This is a summary of what is expected of all 2-D artists when presenting work for jurying for sale at the Center. Although most established artists already have some ideas about presenting their work, the Center also welcomes those emerging artists who may not have had experience with presentation of their work. There have been a number of instances in which the following information would have saved time and effort for both the artist and the Center staff and volunteers.  While this takes extra time and effort on the part of the artists, it is what makes your work look professional and makes it more marketable.  We expect all artists applying and those whose work is accepted by the Center to read and consider the following information carefully.

BASIC  PREPARATION OF WORK FOR DISPLAY GALLERIES

Properly framed and prepared work is an asset that enhances your work, increases the potential for sales and reduces the chance of damage to your work while in transit or on display. Such preparations are the responsibility of the artist, NOT the Center.

GALLERY WRAP CANVASES

Acrylic and oil painting may be painted on gallery wrap canvases, but sides that show the staples are NOT acceptable.  Galley wraps should be painted with a solid neutral color, one that coordinates with the painting, or the art image should continue around the edge of the canvas. These are acceptable for display without additional framing if these steps are taken.  All work must have hanging hardware installed. These canvases hang more effectively when the screw eyes and wire are on the inside of the stretcher bars. The wire when fully taut, must NOT extend above the edge of the canvas, but rather be at least 1” below. Of course, all work must be dry when presented.

FRAMED WORK

All frames, whether metal or wood must be in good repair — tight corners, with no dings, gouges, chips or scratches.  The design of the frame should be appropriate to the style of the work—simple is generally better. If the first comment is “what a pretty frame”, it simply means that the frame has overwhelmed the picture—NOT a good thing. Remember, you want your art work to have the greater impact-not the matting or framing.  Paintings should be properly secured within the frame– no air space showing—and glass should be without chips or cracks and clean on both sides. There should be no “crumblies, cat hair or “critters” under the glass. Hanging wire should be adequate for the weight of the painting; braided or coated wire is best. Weight recommendations are on the roll of wire or packaging for the wire. If the wire strength is inadequate, or the wire is old and has broken strands, your work may fall and the frame or work itself can be damaged.

Wire should be attached with screw eyes or D rings hanger straps. These should be securely attached about 1/3 of the way down the back of the frame in the proper orientation. Double looping the wire through the hangar reduces the possibility that your painting will shift when hung. Excess wire may be trimmed off or wrapped neatly through the hanging wire close to the screw eye or D ring. Do NOT wind it across the entire length of the painting back. When wiring is complete and wire is placed on the hook or nail, the wire should only extend an inch or two higher than the lever of the screw eyes or D rings, and at least 1” below the frame.  When hanging properly, the wire should never show.

Artists using sectional metal frames attached with corner braces should check to assure that all screws are present and firmly secured.  The screws for the hangers should also be tight. Adequate spring clips should be used to hold the paining securely in place. If it rattles, something is possibly wrong.  (Because of their construction, double channel frames are the exception to the rattle rule.)

Clip frames, saw tooth or gummed hangers area NOT acceptable. Dust covers on the back side of framed work give the work a professional appearance. At the very least, the back should look nice, not carry reminders of the poster it may have once been.

PORTFOLIO PIECES

Work presented in a portfolio bin should may be matted only but should be carefully shrink wrapped or bagged in an appropriate size envelope. No grocery zipper storage bags, please. If it is presented without a mat, it should be securely affixed to a backing that is at least 1-2” larger all the way around, to prevent wear and tear on the image.

If your work is matted and shrink wrapped, be sure that the mat is clean, well cut and beveled. No one wants work that looks like the window was cut with a dull blade. The edges should be cleanly cut with no wobbles, ragged corners, or overcuts.  It should have a backing of mat board or foam core-NEVER cardboard. Neutral mats work best, perhaps with a colored liner, and should never detract from the work itself.  Patrons/viewers/customers expect that the artist chose that color for some reason other than expediency. Often they are unable to envision a work as it might look in another mat.  Strongly colored mats generally do not work well—patrons/viewers see it “just not quite right for my house” or do not want to consider the expense and effort of re-matting it in another color. If the presentation attracts more attention than the art work, something is wrong.

At the very least work should be legibly labeled on the reverse with your name, the title, and medium of the work.  Address and other contact information is helpful to the Center, as it is a means of identification if the paperwork or tags are somehow separated from your work during tagging or installation. This makes it easier to identify and reconnect the artist to the work.

THE STANDARDS COMMITTEE WILL ALSO CONSIDER WORK DONE IN MEDIA AND TECHNIQUES NOT LISTED ABOVE.  FINAL ACCEPTABILITY OF ALL ITEMS WILL BE ON THE BASIS OF QUALITY (DESIGN, CRAFTSMANSHIP, AND CREATIVITY).

UNACCEPTABLE AND POTENTIALLY UNACCEPTABLE ITEMS

  1. Anything made from plastic flowers or plastic flower parts (stamens, leaves) is unacceptable.
  1. Plastic foam and other “hobby crafts” such as Fantasy Film, Art Foam, Dip and Drape, plastic bottle crafts, Mod Podge, etc. will not be sold through the shop. Other miscellaneous crafts such as egg crafts, glass bottle crafts, crafts made with plywood or pipe cleaners, etc. will be judged on amount and quality of handwork, originality and marketability.
  1. We discourage the use of artificial products such as sequins, “googly eyes,” plastic beads, metallic braid, etc.  Their use should be kept to a minimum and items containing them may be turned down.  (Christmas ornaments could be an exception.)
  1. Skill of craftsmanship should show in all items; therefore, shortcuts that give the appearance of handwork are unacceptable.  This includes the following:
    1. “Liquid embroidery,” felt markers, etc. should not be used in place of embroidery.
    2. The use of commercially printed fabric that looks like batik, quilting, trapunto, embroidery, patchwork, appliqué, etc , will probably be turned down.
    3. The use of commercially quilted fabric in any craft.
    4. Cut and glued decorations made from fabric, felt, braid, ribbon, rickrack, buttons, beads, etc. will be much more acceptable if hand or machine sewing is used for assembly, instead of glue.
  1. Knits, especially polyester, are not suitable for quilting. Traditional woven fabrics for pillows, wall hangings, etc. are acceptable.
  1. At this time, we are unable to accept food products.
  1. At this time, we are unable to accept non-sewn clothing without further decoration. (An embroidered blouse or hand painted skirt may be acceptable, small sewn accessory items may be acceptable.)
  2. Objects made of found material are acceptable only if of distinctive and original design.
  3. Original kits may be acceptable. However, the jury process may take longer as the jurors will need to assemble a sample kit following the directions provided.

 

THE STANDARDS COMMITTEE WILL ALSO CONSIDER WORK DONE IN MEDIA AND TECHNIQUES NOT LISTED ABOVE.  FINAL ACCEPTABILITY OF ALL ITEMS WILL BE ON THE BASIS OF QUALITY (DESIGN, CRAFTSMANSHIP, AND CREATIVITY).